Kriya Yoga is thus “union (yoga) with the Infinite… The word ‘Yoga’ is derived from the Sanskrit root ‘Yuj’, meaning ‘to join’ or ‘to yoke’ or ‘to unite’. Namaste! Others may find it less then relevant to their ambitions. Yogini : word used for woman … prajna, Vairagya (“dispassion”): the attitude of inner ren. Understanding Sanskrit Names For Yoga Postures. Yoga : Union (original verb Yuj is to join) Yoga is to join Atman (individual consciousness) with Param Atman (universal consciousness) Yogi / Siddha : One who has reached the state of Union. It encompasses the beginning, middle and end in its 3 sounds: a-u-m, namaste means the light in me salutes the light in you– it’s a beautiful greeting or closing, Im looking for more information on Pratipaksha Havana. In most cases, a good yoga teacher will incorporate plenty of non-Sanskrit instructions, as well as the words’ English-language translations, as you go through the class. The Sanskrit word Hala हल [also hÄ la] means plow, as in a traditional plow that is drawn by a horse or oxen. brahman–derived from the Sanskrit root brmh meaning to grow, to expand, to bellow, to roar. It can be chanted, sung pr repeated internally for meditation. ), Shodhana (“cleansing/purification”): a fundamental aspect of all yogic paths; a category of purification practices in hatha yoga, Shraddha (“faith”): an essential disposition on the yogic path, which must be distinguished from mere belief, Shuddhi (“purification/purity”): the state of purity; a synonym of shodhana, Siddha (“accomplished”): an adept, often of Tantra; if fully Self-realized, the designation maha-siddha or “great adept” is often used, Siddha-Yoga (“Yoga of the adepts”): a designation applied especially to the yoga of Kashmiri Shaivism, as taught by Swami Muktananda (twentieth century), Siddhi (“accomplishment/perfection”): spiritual perfection, the attainment of flawless identity with the ultimate Reality (atman or brahman); paranormal ability, of which the yoga tradition knows many kinds, Spanda (“vibration”): a key concept of Kashmir’s Shaivism according to which the ultimate Reality itself “quivers,” that is, is inherently creative rather than static (as conceived in Advaita Vedanta), Sushumna-nadi (“very gracious channel”): the central prana current or arc in or along which the serpent power (kundalini-shakti) must ascend toward the psychoenergetic center (cakra) at the crown of the head in order to attain liberation (moksha), Sutra (“thread”): an aphoristic statement; a work consisting of aphoristic statements, such as Patanjali’s Yoga Sutra or Vasugupta’s Shiva-Sutra, Svadhyaya (“one’s own going into”): study, an important aspect of the yogic path, listed among the practices of self-restraint (niyama) in >Patanjali’s eightfold yoga; the recitation of mantras (see also japa), Tantra (“Loom”): a type of Sanskrit work containing Tantric teachings; the tradition of Tantrism, which focuses on the shakti side of spiritual life and which originated in the early post-Christian era and achieved its classical features around 1000 C.E. drishti, Deva (“he who is shining”): a male deity, such as Shiva, Vishnu, or Krishna, either in the sense of the ultimate Reality or a high angelic being, Devi (“she who is shining”): a female deity such as Parvati, Lakshmi, or Radha, either in the sense of the ultimate Reality (in its feminine pole) or a high angelic being, Dharana (“holding”): concentration, the sixth limb (anga) of Patanjali’s eight-limbed yoga, Dharma (“bearer”): a term of numerous meanings; often used in the sense of “law,” “lawfulness,” “virtue,” “righteousness,” “norm”, Dhyana (“ideating”): meditation, the seventh limb (anga) of Patanjali’s eight-limbed yoga, Diksha (“initiation”): the act and condition of induction into the hidden aspects of yoga or a particular lineage of teachers; all traditional yoga is initiatory, Drishti (“view/sight”): yogic gazing, such as at the tip of the nose or the spot between the eyebrows; cf. Sanskrit is an exquisite language from ancient India whose beauty and design set it apart from ordinary language. The roots, verb-forms, and primary derivatives of the Sanskrit language. Pingala-nadi (“reddish conduit”): the prana current or arc ascending on the right side of the central channel (sushumna-nadi) and associated with the sympathetic nervous system and having an energizing effect on the mind when activated; cf. guru, Advaita (“nonduality”): the truth and teaching that there is only One Reality (Atman, Brahman), especially as found in the Upanishads; see also Vedanta, Ahamkara (“I-maker”): the individuation principle, or ego, which must be transcended; cf. Yuj is a Sanskrit root word which means “to yoke,” “to unite,” “to add” or “to join. buddhi, Mandala (“circle”): a circular design symbolizing the cosmos and specific to a deity, Mantra (from the verbal root man “to think”): a sacred sound or phrase, such as om, hum, or om namah shivaya, that has a transformative effect on the mind of the individual reciting it; to be ultimately effective, a mantra needs to be given in an initiatory context (diksha), Mantra-Yoga: the yogic path utilizing mantras as the primary means of liberation, Marman (“lethal [spot]”): in Ayurveda and yoga, a vital spot on the physical body where energy is concentrated or blocked; cf. As per Yogic scriptures the practice of Yoga leads to the union of individual consciousness with that of the Universal Consciousness, indicating a perfect harmony between the mind and body, Man & Nature. brahman, Avadhuta (“he who has shed [everything]”): a radical type of renouncer (samnyasin) who often engages in unconventional behavior, Avidya (“ignorance”): the root cause of suffering (duhkha); also called ajnana; cf. Yama is the first of the eight limbs of yoga outlined in the yoga sutras. If you’re new to yoga (or even if you’re not), you may have heard words in class that you don’t recognise. 21,770 Views But in order to understand yoga, you must study its root language. I’m Katia and I love to do yoga and blog. The word Yoga comes from the Sanskrit root “Yuj” which means “to join.” Yoga is a science that teaches us the method of joining the individual soul and the Supreme Soul. Ahimsa — Non-harm.. Ananda — Bliss, joy, our true nature.. Amma/Ma — Mother/ Devine Mother.. Avatar — An embodiment or incarnation of the devine (you, me, us!).. Sanskrit Words, Asana Names, Mantras and Devotional Songs related to Yoga. As I’ve gotten more into teaching yoga, knowing the sanskrit names has really helped my understanding of the poses and what the focus of the shape is. This is a complete list of all Sanskrit Dhatu or Root words. To facilitate understanding the names of poses in yoga is most helpful to gain an understanding of what the root words are that forms the construct of each. Directional sanskrit words, sanskrit numbers, sanskrit body parts, ... 70+ Sanskrit words you need to know for your yoga practice. Yogi through Hindi योगी yogi from Sanskrit योगिन् yogin, one who practices yoga or ascetic. Balasana - Child's pose. Baddha - Bound, caught, restrained, firm. Your Guide to Common Sanskrit Words Used In Yoga. Bakasana - Elbow balancing pose. *, Any one of these could go with virabhadrasana or warrior pose, anga means limb in terms of your body parts and the 8 limbs of yoga, bitilasana means cow pose gomukhasana means cow face pose, (Eka Pada) Rajakapotasana means (one foot) pigeon pose, ananda means bliss or happiness– as in happy baby: ananda balasana, moksha means freedom from the cycle of rebirth– on to a state of bliss, shanti means peace and is often chanted at the end of a yoga class, atman means soul/self— your individual essence, prana means life force of life energy and pranayama is breath work– moving the life force through your body, ayurveda is the  science of life it’s basically like Hindu health care, shala is the yoga studio or yoga space it translates as home or abode, drishti means the gaze, view, or sight– it’s where you look during your pose and there are 9 different drishti points, chakra actually means wheel or circle and refers to 7 energy centers, starting with the root chakra, dharma means righteousness and also refers to doing the main thing you feel drawn to do– a rooster’s dharma is to crow, karma is the force created by the actions you take, black or white (similar to good and bad, but not quite the same), guru translates as dark light and means teacher– the one who guides you from the dark to the light, mudra means seal and is usually in reference to ways to hold your fingers to make meaningful shapes– like yoga for the hands, mantra is a sacred message and can come in the form of a syllable or phrase. The word "yoga" comes from the Sanskrit root yuj, ... Yoga is an ancient art based on a harmonizing system of development for the body, mind, and spirit. Yama is also sometimes called “the five restraints” because it describes what one should avoid to advance on the spiritual path.. Z Zen through Japanese 禅 and Chinese 禪 Chán ultimately from Pali झन jhāna and Sanskrit ध्यान dhyana, which means "a meditation". See also ... starting with the root chakra. The word ‘Yoga’ is derived from the Sanskrit root ‘Yuj’, meaning ‘to join’ or ‘to yoke’ or ‘to unite’. Yoga is a Sanskrit word derived from the Sanskrit root "yuj" which means to connect, join or balance. You’ll also hear instructors offer– “you can take a bind here” where you connect parts of your body around another part– often your arms around a leg or around your back, supta means on your back– you’ll hear the word supine poses which means poses on your back– as in supta baddha konasana reclining bound angle pose, uttan means bending forward as in uttanasana or forward fold, utthita means extended like utthita parsvakonasana or extended side angle, parsva means side like parsva bakasana or side crane #51 Yoga . Sanskrit language is around 3500 years old. Here is the full list with … In honor of YJ's 40th anniversary, we chose 40 common and important Sanskrit words to know. Enclose the word in “” for an EXACT match e.g. The meaning of the word Yoga is “union”. Please note that we independently source all of the products that we feature on yogajournal.com. Devanagari, Roman transliteration (IAST with diacritical marks and simplified Sanskrit). A. Abhanavarana: Screening the outshining Bragman; one of the two Avarana Saktis which is removed by Aparoksha Jnana. Aranyaka, Brahmana, Veda, Upaya (“means”): in Buddhist yoga, the practice of compassion (karuna); cf. Recognition of word forms is usefull to an extant; however, regarding the history and meanings of words not much of that will be found here. Sanskrit words in yoga. “yoga”. Create a personalized feed and bookmark your favorites. (This article refers to yama as outlined in Patanjali yoga sutras, not Yama the Hindu god of death.). Sanskrit is a beautiful language and to familiarize yourself with it is to honor the roots, lineage and essence of your yoga practice. Glossary of Sanskrit terms. muni, Sadhana (“accomplishing”): spiritual discipline leading to siddhi (“perfection” or “accomplishment”); the term is specifically used in Tantra, Sahaja (“together born”): a medieval term denoting the fact that the transcendental Reality and the empirical reality are not truly separate but coexist, or with the latter being an aspect or misperception of the former; often rendered as “spontaneous” or “spontaneity”; the sahaja state is the natural condition, that is, enlightenment or realization, Samadhi (“putting together”): the ecstatic or unitive state in which the meditator becomes one with the object of meditation, the eighth and final limb (anga) of Patanjali’s eightfold path; there are many types of samadhi, the most significant distinction being between samprajnata (conscious) and asamprajnata (supraconscious) ecstasy; only the latter leads to the dissolution of the karmic factors deep within the mind; beyond both types of ecstasy is enlightenment, which is also sometimes called sahaja-samadhi or the condition of “natural” or “spontaneous” ecstasy, where there is perfect continuity of superconscious throughout waking, dreaming, and sleeping, Samatva or samata (“evenness”): the mental condition of harmony, balance, Samkhya (“Number”): one of the main traditions of Hinduism, which is concerned with the classification of the principles (tattva) of existence and their proper discernment in order to distinguish between Spirit (purusha) and the various aspects of Nature (prakriti); this influential system grew out of the ancient (pre-Buddhist) Samkhya-Yoga tradition and was codified in the Samkhya-Karika of Ishvara Krishna (c. 350 C.E. Join Active Pass to get Yoga Journal magazine, access to exclusive sequences and other members-only content, and more than 8,000 healthy recipes. asmita; see also buddhi, manas, Ahimsa (“nonharming”): the single most important moral discipline (yama), Akasha (“ether/space”): the first of the five material elements of which the physical universe is composed; also used to designate “inner” space, that is, the space of consciousness (called cid-akasha), Amrita (“immortal/immortality”): a designation of the deathless Spirit (atman, purusha); also the nectar of immortality that oozes from the psychoenergetic center at the crown of the head (see sahasrara-cakra) when it is activated and transforms the body into a “divine body” (divya-deha), Ananda (“bliss”): the condition of utter joy, which is an essential quality of the ultimate Reality (tattva), Anga (“limb”): a fundamental category of the yogic path, such as asana, dharana, dhyana, niyama, pranayama, pratyahara, samadhi, yama; also the body (deha, sharira), Arjuna (“White”): one of the five Pandava princes who fought in the great war depicted in the Mahabharata, disciple of the God-man Krishna whose teachings can be found in the Bhagavad Gita, Asana (“seat”): a physical posture (see also anga, mudra); the third limb (anga) of Patanjali’s eightfold path (astha-anga-yoga); originally this meant only meditation posture, but subsequently, in hatha yoga, this aspect of the yogic path was greatly developed, Ashrama (“that where effort is made”): a hermitage; also a stage of life, such as brahmacharya, householder, forest dweller, and complete renouncer (samnyasin), Ashta-anga-yoga, ashtanga-yoga (“eight-limbed union”): the eightfold yoga of Patanjali, consisting of moral discipline (yama), self-restraint (niyama), posture (asana), breath control (pranayama), sensory inhibition (pratyahara), concentration (dharana), meditation (dhyana), and ecstasy (samadhi), leading to liberation (kaivalya), Read The Bhagavad Gita: The Song of God Retold in Simplified English, Asmita (“I-am-ness”): a concept of Patanjali’s eight-limbed yoga, roughly synonymous with ahamkara, Atman (“self”): the transcendental Self, or Spirit, which is eternal and superconscious; our true nature or identity; sometimes a distinction is made between the atman as the individual self and the parama-atman as the transcendental Self; see also purusha; cf. I can’t teach you about Sanskrit in one blog post, but I can provide loose translations for the most common Sanskrit words used in yoga. Over 3500 years old, Sanskrit arose among people who valued inner peace over outer possessions. My #1 fav is Lokah Samastah Sukhino Bhavantu, tantra translates as loom or weave but relates to ritual practices, sometimes sexual, yantra also means loom and is a symbol of a deity in a shape (often square) used to concentrate on for mediation, mandala translates as circle and is a geometric shape representing the universe- usually symmetrical around a center, om is the sound of the universe. If you practice yoga, then you’ve seen some Sanskrit words. avidya, Jnana-Yoga (“Yoga of wisdom”): the path to liberation based on wisdom, or the direct intuition of the transcendental Self (atman) through the steady application of discernment between the Real and the unreal and renunciation of what has been identified as unreal (or inconsequential to the achievement of liberation), Kaivalya (“isolation”): the state of absolute freedom from conditioned existence, as explained in ashta-anga-yoga; in the nondualistic (advaita) traditions of India, this is usually called moksha or mukti (meaning “release” from the fetters of ignorance, or avidya), Kali: a Goddess embodying the fierce (dissolving) aspect of the Divine, Kali-yuga: the dark age of spiritual and moral decline, said to be current now; kali does not refer to the Goddess Kali but to the losing throw of a die, Kama (“desire”): the appetite for sensual pleasure blocking the path to true bliss (ananda); the only desire conducive to freedom is the impulse toward liberation, called mumukshutva, Kapila (“He who is red”): a great sage, the quasi-mythical founder of the Samkhya tradition, who is said to have composed the Samkhya-Sutra (which, however, appears to be of a much later date), Karman, karma (“action”): activity of any kind, including ritual acts; said to be binding only so long as engaged in a self-centered way; the “karmic” consequence of one’s actions; destiny, Karma Yoga (“Yoga of action”): the liberating path of self-transcending action, Karuna (“compassion”): universal sympathy; in Buddhist yoga the complement of wisdom (prajna), Khecari-mudra (“space-walking seal”): the Tantric practice of curling the tongue back against the upper palate in order to seal the life energy (prana); see also mudra, Kosha (“casing”): any one of five “envelopes” surrounding the transcendental Self (atman) and thus blocking its light: anna-maya-kosha (“envelope made of food,” the physical body), prana-maya-kosha (“envelope made of life force”), mano-maya-kosha (“envelope made of mind”), vijnana-maya-kosha (“envelope made of consciousness”), and ananda-maya-kosha (“envelope made of bliss”); some older traditions regard the last kosha as identical with the Self (atman), Krishna (“Puller”): an incarnation of God Vishnu, the God-man whose teachings can be found in the Bhagavad Gita and the Bhagavata-Purana/p>, Kumbhaka (“potlike”): breath retention; cf. 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